Even though the state of New Hampshire is among the smallest states of the country, it shows great potential for psychologists. Psychologists are doctors who help people with mental health problems and behavioral issues.

Should I Become a Psychologist in New Hampshire?

Psychologists may choose to work at hospitals, clinics or other work settings such as industrial, educational and so on. Typically, psychologists are required to do the following,

  • Provide face to face consultations to their clients
  • Classify emotional, psychological, organizational or behavioral issues
  • Diagnose disorders and discuss the treatment of problems with clients etc.
Education Required A doctoral degree
Major Requirement Psychology
License/Certification Licensure is mandatory
Experience/Training Supervised field experience of 2 years (minimum)
Key Skills Problem-solving, Observational, Organizational, Analytical and Communication Skills, Patience and Integrity etc.
Annual Mean Salary (2019)-National $98,230 (for Psychologists, All Other)
Annual Mean Salary (2019)-New Hampshire $94,800 (for Psychologists, All Other)
Job Outlook(2018-2028) 14% (Faster than the average)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (2019)

Career Outlook

According to the prediction made by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a 14% rise in employment is anticipated for psychologists between 2018 and 2028. This prediction is based on the expected increase in the demand for psychologists in the coming years.

Steps to Become a Psychologist in New Hampshire

Becoming a psychologist begins with completion of a bachelor’s degree and ends with acquisition of licensure. If you are interested in pursuing this career, follow this 5-step guide to get started!

  1. Obtain a Bachelor’s Degree
  2. The first step of this journey is completion of a bachelor’s degree in Psychology. It may take approximately 4 years to complete and it is offered by many universities in New Hampshire such as, the Southern New Hampshire University.
  1. Earn a Master’s Degree
  2. You need to complete a master’s degree in Psychology if,

    • You did not complete your bachelor’s degree with a major in Psychology
    • Or, your grades were not up to the mark to get direct admission in a doctoral program
  1. Acquire a Doctoral Degree
  2. It is mandatory for all psychologists to possess at least a doctoral degree before applying for licensure. A typical PhD in Psychology may take 4-6 years to complete and graduation requirements vary for each university.
  1. Get Field Experience
  2. The New Hampshire Board of Psychologists mandates that all aspiring psychologists acquire at least 2 years of work experience under the supervision of a licensed psychologist before formally applying for a license.
  1. Application for a State Issued License
  2. The New Hampshire Board of Psychologists regulates the licensure process for all psychologists who want to practice in the state. The details of this process are explained below.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Psychologist in New Hampshire?

The duration of becoming a licensed psychologist depends on the educational and career choices you make. From completion of required education to getting a license may take you at least 12 years may be more.

What Are the Requirements for Becoming a Psychologist in New Hampshire?

To work as a licensed psychologist in the state of New Hampshire, candidates need to provide proof of the following:

  • Possession of an APA or ASPPB accredited doctoral degree in Psychology
  • Completion of a minimum of 2 years of supervised work experience
  • Passing the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)
  • Possession of a valid photo identification
  • Not having any criminal record
  • Submission of application fee

How Much Can I Make as a Psychologist in New Hampshire?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the annual mean salary of people employed in the category of “Psychologists, All Other” in the state of New Hampshire was reported to be $94,800. Whereas, California, with an annual mean income of $117,610, was the highest paying state for this occupation in 2019.