If you are planning to practice psychology in the Tar Heel State, then the following guide on how to become a psychologist in North Carolina would be of great use to you. Learn about the educational requirements, licensing requirements and salary outlook for this profession in North Carolina.

Should I Become a Psychologist in North Carolina?

The field of psychology is ideal for those who have a strong interest in studying the human mind and applying their findings to understanding various behavioral components.

The following table provides a quick insight into the career of a psychologist in North Carolina.

Education Required Master’s or a Doctoral Degree
Training Required, pre- or post-doctoral
Licenses/Certifications Required in North Carolina
Key Skills Analytical Skills, Attention to Detail, Integrity, Ethics, Interpersonal Skills, Observational Skills, Communication Skills, Empathy, Patience
Annual Mean Salary (2019)-National $87,450 (Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists)
Job Outlook (2018-28) 14%
Annual Mean Salary (2019)–North Carolina $80,670 (Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists)

Career Outlook for Psychologists in North Carolina

Psychologists in the Tar Heel state are expected to experience a tremendous growth in the number of jobs, in the years from 2018 to 2028 as per data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. According to O*Net Online, Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists will experience a job growth of 15% in North Carolina between 2016 and 2026, adding 340 new jobs annually. This demand will be caused by multiple factors, such as the aging population requiring more psychiatric attention, veterans dealing with war trauma and people with developmental disorders, like autism, needing consistent psychological treatment.

Steps to Become a Psychologist in North Carolina

  1. Complete an Undergraduate Degree
  2. Aspiring psychologists are not required to complete this degree in a specific major, though it is recommended that they take up certain prerequisite courses.

  1. Get a Master’s Degree in Psychology (Optional)
  2. There are some occupations that hire graduates with a standalone master’s degree. Most employers, however, prefer those with a doctoral degree. A master’s degree in psychology is ideal for those who have no prior knowledge on the subject.

  1. Get a Doctoral Degree
  2. Aspiring psychologists have two options at this stage – a Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) or a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). A Psy.D. is meant for those who intend to go into clinical practice, while a Ph.D. is ideal for those who want a career in research.

  1. Complete the Supervised Experience Requirement
  2. This would typically be 2 years of supervised professional experience.

  1. Apply for a License
  2. The practice of psychology in North Carolina is overseen by the North Carolina Psychology Board. All the rules for licensure and its eligibility criteria are provided on the Board’s official website.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Psychologist in North Carolina?

To become a psychologist in North Carolina, it will take approximately 10 years or more. This would include the undergraduate degree and the doctoral program, along with experience requirements.

What Are the Requirements for Becoming a Psychologist in North Carolina?

In order to practice psychology in the Tar Heel State, candidates will have to meet the following requirements. They must:

  • Have an undergraduate degree
  • Have a doctoral degree
  • Have completed the required number of hours of supervised experience
  • Have completed the licensure requirements for application

How Much Can I Make after Becoming a Psychologist in North Carolina?

Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists in North Carolina made an annual mean income of $80,670 in 2019. The salary earning potential varied according to location, industry and specialization. For instance, the highest pay earned by Clinical, Counseling and School Psychologists all across the US was in Child Day Care Services, followed by Home Health Care Services and Offices of Other Health Practitioners.